The Crown of Thorns

Author:,

Publisher:George Ellis

ISBN:

Total Pages:303

Viewed:830

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Books Description:

(Book 2 of the Bhesar Trilogy--Contains some violence. May not be suitable for readers under 15 years of age.) Eugene has crossed into the Beings' world, a place of technological wonder. Together with Ruben, she seeks to return to Bhesar, but they are forced to stay at the Union of Central Province. Here, they soon discover that behind the pristine facade lies a brutal hierarchical system, one that puts the lower-ranked officers at the mercy of their superiors. And it is through this system that the Beings hope to trap Eugene and Ruben into staying at the Province forever . . . Keywords: young adult fantasy, fantasy series, romance, institute, doppelganger, parallel world, wolf, telepathy

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Planetary: Crossing Worlds

Author:Warren Ellis

Publisher:DC

ISBN:1401239986

Total Pages:N.A

Viewed:1375

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Three fantastic crossovers „ all written by Warren Ellis „ are collected in one spectacular collection! This volume collects PLANETARY/THE AUTHORITY, PLANETARY/JLA, and PLANETARY/BATMAN, featuring gorgeous art by fan-favorites John Cassaday, Phil Jimenez and Jerry Ordway!

Crossing Between Worlds

Author:Jeanne M. Simonelli

Publisher:Waveland Press

ISBN:1478610239

Total Pages:138

Viewed:1100

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The Navajo people of Canyon de Chelly must negotiate a delicate balance between the old and the new as they struggle to maintain their traditional ways of life in the midst of archaeologists, U.S. Park Service employees, and the increasing numbers of tourists who come to visit this hauntingly beautiful part of northeastern Arizona. Anthropologist-writer Jeanne Simonelli, who worked at Canyon de Chelly as a seasonal park ranger, interweaves stories of her personal experiences and friendships with canyon residents with discussions of native history and culture in the region. Focusing on the members of one extended Navajo family, Simonelli describes the small moments of their daily lives: shearing goats, baking bread, attending a solemn all-night health ceremony, washing clothes at the local laundromat, playing traditional games and contemporary sports, talking about the history of the Dinthe Navajo peopleand pondering the changes they have witnessed in the canyon and the difficulties they confront. Crossing Between Worlds is sumptuously illustrated with insightful black-and-white photographs that document the everyday activities of Navajo families in one of the most spectacular corners of the American Southwest.

Otherwise Worlds

Author:Tiffany Lethabo King,Jenell Navarro,Andrea Smith

Publisher:Duke University Press

ISBN:1478012021

Total Pages:394

Viewed:1126

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The contributors to Otherwise Worlds investigate the complex relationships between settler colonialism and anti-Blackness to explore the political possibilities that emerge from such inquiries. Pointing out that presumptions of solidarity, antagonism, or incommensurability between Black and Native communities are insufficient to understand the relationships between the groups, the volume's scholars, artists, and activists look to articulate new modes of living and organizing in the service of creating new futures. Among other topics, they examine the ontological status of Blackness and Indigeneity, possible forms of relationality between Black and Native communities, perspectives on Black and Indigenous sociality, and freeing the flesh from the constraints of violence and settler colonialism. Throughout the volume's essays, art, and interviews, the contributors carefully attend to alternative kinds of relationships between Black and Native communities that can lead toward liberation. In so doing, they critically point to the importance of Black and Indigenous conversations for formulating otherwise worlds. Contributors Maile Arvin, Marcus Briggs-Cloud, J. Kameron Carter, Ashon Crawley, Denise Ferreira da Silva, Chris Finley, Hotvlkuce Harjo, Sandra Harvey, Chad B. Infante, Tiffany Lethabo King, Jenell Navarro, Lindsay Nixon, Kimberly Robertson, Jared Sexton, Andrea Smith, Cedric Sunray, Se’mana Thompson, Frank B. Wilderson

Sonic Possible Worlds

Author:Salomé Voegelin

Publisher:Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN:1623568005

Total Pages:216

Viewed:1772

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Inspired by its use in literary theory, film criticism and the discourse of game design, Salomé Voegelin adapts and develops “possible world theory” in relation to sound. David K Lewis' Possible World is juxtaposed with Maurice Merleau-Ponty's life-world, to produce a meeting of the semantic and the phenomenological at the place of listening. The central tenet of Sonic Possible Worlds is that at present traditional musical compositions and contemporary sonic outputs are approached and investigated through separate and distinct critical languages and histories. As a consequence, no continuous and comparative study of the field is possible. In Sonic Possible Worlds, Voegelin proposes a new analytical framework that can access and investigate works across genres and times, enabling a comparative engagement where composers such as Henry Purcell and Nadia Boulanger encounter sound art works by Shilpa Gupta and Christina Kubisch and where the soundscape compositions of Chris Watson and Francisco López resound in the visual worlds of Louise Bourgeois.

Sonic Possible Worlds, Revised Edition

Author:Salomé Voegelin

Publisher:Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN:1501367641

Total Pages:272

Viewed:1088

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From its use in literary theory, film criticism and the discourse of games design, Salomé Voegelin expands 'possible world theory' to think the worlding of sound in music, in art and in the everyday. The modal logic of possible worlds, articulated principally via David K. Lewis and developed through Maurice Merleau-Ponty's phenomenological life-worlds, creates a view on the invisible slices of the world and reflects on how to make them count, politically and aesthetically. How to make them thinkable and accessible as the possibility of the everyday and of art: to reach a new materialist understanding from the invisible and to develop an ear for the as yet inaudible. This revised edition continues Voegelin's exploration of the sonic possibility of the world into the sonic possibility and impossibility of the body. Listening to work by Áine O'Dwyer, Hannah Silva and Jocy de Oliveira, it considers sonic possible worlds' radical power to rethink normative constructions and to fabulate a different body from its sound: Hearing the Continuum Between Plural Bodies; between humans, humanoid aliens, monsters, vampires, plants, things and anything we have no name for yet but which a sonic philosophy might start to hear and call.

The Pathwalker's Guide to the Nine Worlds

Author:Raven Kaldera

Publisher:Lulu Press, Inc

ISBN:1458398730

Total Pages:N.A

Viewed:1549

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The Pathwalker's Guide to the Nine Worlds is the first written exploration of the ancient Norse/Germanic cosmology not by academics and mythologists, but by the experiences of northern-tradition spirit-workers astrally visiting the Cosmos of the World Tree and the Nine Worlds that surround it. Written as a travelogue and etiquette-primer for would-be worldwalkers, and centered around the author's experiences on a nine-day walking tour of the Nine Worlds, this is the first book of its kind ever published.

The Oxford Handbook of Indigenous American Literature

Author:James H. Cox,Daniel Heath Justice

Publisher:Oxford University Press

ISBN:0199914044

Total Pages:704

Viewed:1832

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Over the course of the last twenty years, Native American and Indigenous American literary studies has experienced a dramatic shift from a critical focus on identity and authenticity to the intellectual, cultural, political, historical, and tribal nation contexts from which these Indigenous literatures emerge. The Oxford Handbook of Indigenous American Literature reflects on these changes and provides a complete overview of the current state of the field. The Handbook's forty-three essays, organized into four sections, cover oral traditions, poetry, drama, non-fiction, fiction, and other forms of Indigenous American writing from the seventeenth through the twenty-first century. Part I attends to literary histories across a range of communities, providing, for example, analyses of Inuit, Chicana/o, Anishinaabe, and Métis literary practices. Part II draws on earlier disciplinary and historical contexts to focus on specific genres, as authors discuss Indigenous non-fiction, emergent trans-Indigenous autobiography, Mexicanoh and Spanish poetry, Native drama in the U.S. and Canada, and even a new Indigenous children's literature canon. The third section delves into contemporary modes of critical inquiry to expound on politics of place, comparative Indigenism, trans-Indigenism, Native rhetoric, and the power of Indigenous writing to communities of readers. A final section thoroughly explores the geographical breadth and expanded definition of Indigenous American through detailed accounts of literature from Indian Territory, the Red Atlantic, the far North, Yucatán, Amerika Samoa, and Francophone Quebec. Together, the volume is the most comprehensive and expansive critical handbook of Indigenous American literatures published to date. It is the first to fully take into account the last twenty years of recovery and scholarship, and the first to most significantly address the diverse range of texts, secondary archives, writing traditions, literary histories, geographic and political contexts, and critical discourses in the field.

Growing Up with the Country

Author:Kendra Taira Field

Publisher:Yale University Press

ISBN:0300182287

Total Pages:352

Viewed:1807

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The masterful and poignant story of three African-American families who journeyed west after emancipation, by an award-winning scholar and descendant of the migrants Following the lead of her own ancestors, Kendra Field’s epic family history chronicles the westward migration of freedom’s first generation in the fifty years after emancipation. Drawing on decades of archival research and family lore within and beyond the United States, Field traces their journey out of the South to Indian Territory, where they participated in the development of black and black Indian towns and settlements. When statehood, oil speculation, and Jim Crow segregation imperiled their lives and livelihoods, these formerly enslaved men and women again chose emigration. Some migrants launched a powerful back-to-Africa movement, while others moved on to Canada and Mexico. Their lives and choices deepen and widen the roots of the Great Migration. Interweaving black, white, and Indian histories, Field’s beautifully wrought narrative explores how ideas about race and color powerfully shaped the pursuit of freedom.

Transformable Race

Author:Katy L. Chiles

Publisher:Oxford University Press

ISBN:0199313512

Total Pages:336

Viewed:805

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As surprising as it might seem now, during the late eighteenth century many early Americans asked themselves, "How could a person of one race come to be another?" Racial thought at the close of the eighteenth century differed radically from that of the nineteenth century, when the concept of race as a fixed biological category would emerge. Instead, many early Americans thought that race was an exterior bodily trait, incrementally produced by environmental factors and continuously subject to change. While historians have documented aspects of eighteenth-century racial thought, Transformable Race is the first scholarly book that identifies how this thinking informs the figurative language in the literature of this crucial period. It argues that the notion of "transformable race" structured how early American texts portrayed the formation of racial identities. Examining figures such as Phillis Wheatley, Benjamin Franklin, Samson Occom, and Charles Brockden Brown, Transformable Race demonstrates how these authors used language emphasizing or questioning the potential malleability of physical features to explore the construction of racial categories.

Twinborn Chronicles: War of 3 Worlds

Author:J.S. Morin

Publisher:Magical Scrivener Press

ISBN:1939233577

Total Pages:N.A

Viewed:1929

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Humanity needs a savior. But a rivalry between two tinkers threatens to destroy the world they're trying to free. Cadmus Errol is the greatest inventor that Tellurak has ever known. His clockwork graces the spires of cities across the world. Yet in another, darker world, he lives the life of a slave. There, humanity is held underfoot, bound in service to the victors of a war fought untold generations ago. It will take all the wits and resources of the best that humanity can muster to break that hold. Can Cadmus Errol, the Mad Tinker, be the one to free them all? Or will his daughter take a shortcut through dangerous science to wipe out humanities oppressors? The Twinborn Chronicles: War of 3 Worlds is an epic fantasy series with multiple point of view characters. If you love steampunk gadgetry, heroes who get their hands dirty, and a DIY heroine, this series is for you! Pick up your copy of the second full collection, and discover an ally you never knew you had.

A Taste of Israeli Life

Author:Carrie Taylor Goldberg

Publisher:WestBow Press

ISBN:1664231943

Total Pages:262

Viewed:870

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Books Description:

This book takes the reader along on unique travel adventures, through touching and humorous anecdotes, with a Canadian learning to live like a local in Israel. From apartment dwellings to riding the rakevet, Hebrew language ulpan to donning an army uniform, it may form a bridge of understanding inside and outside of the Jewish community. Humbly learn from the Jewish community with me. Come, see the beauty of the Land and People of Israel through my eyes. Sample a taste of Israeli life—in peaceful moments and in the midst of rocket fire. Experience the wonder of my first time there, and explore deeper as over 18 months’ span familiar surroundings retained a unique place in my heart and soul. See – the historical landscape and meet the diverse peoples Hear – Hebrew, the sounding of the shofar, the cooing of the dove Smell – the varied fragrant incense, the sweet jasmine flower Taste – the famous falafal, milk and honey, fresh-picked fruit Touch – the waxy, bumpy Western Wall where multitudes have wept

Soul Factory

Author:Gun GunLai

Publisher:Funstory

ISBN:1649553498

Total Pages:N.A

Viewed:1749

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I paid a high salary and went to work as a security guard at a factory that makes auto parts. I later learned that the factory's products were not auto parts at all, but.

The Space Between Worlds

Author:Micaiah Johnson

Publisher:Del Rey

ISBN:0593135067

Total Pages:336

Viewed:504

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NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW EDITORS’ CHOICE • An outsider who can travel between worlds discovers a secret that threatens the very fabric of the multiverse in this stunning debut, a powerful examination of identity, privilege, and belonging. WINNER OF THE COMPTON CROOK AWARD • FINALIST FOR THE LOCUS AWARD • “Gorgeous writing, mind-bending world-building, razor-sharp social commentary, and a main character who demands your attention—and your allegiance.”—Rob Hart, author of The Warehouse NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY NPR • Library Journal • Book Riot Multiverse travel is finally possible, but there’s just one catch: No one can visit a world where their counterpart is still alive. Enter Cara, whose parallel selves happen to be exceptionally good at dying—from disease, turf wars, or vendettas they couldn’t outrun. Cara’s life has been cut short on 372 worlds in total. On this dystopian Earth, however, Cara has survived. Identified as an outlier and therefore a perfect candidate for multiverse travel, Cara is plucked from the dirt of the wastelands. Now what once made her marginalized has finally become an unexpected source of power. She has a nice apartment on the lower levels of the wealthy and walled-off Wiley City. She works—and shamelessly flirts—with her enticing yet aloof handler, Dell, as the two women collect off-world data for the Eldridge Institute. She even occasionally leaves the city to visit her family in the wastes, though she struggles to feel at home in either place. So long as she can keep her head down and avoid trouble, Cara is on a sure path to citizenship and security. But trouble finds Cara when one of her eight remaining doppelgängers dies under mysterious circumstances, plunging her into a new world with an old secret. What she discovers will connect her past and her future in ways she could have never imagined—and reveal her own role in a plot that endangers not just her world but the entire multiverse. “Clever characters, surprise twists, plenty of action, and a plot that highlights social and racial inequities in astute prose.”—Library Journal (starred review)

Kyoto Animation

Author:Dani Cavallaro

Publisher:McFarland

ISBN:1476600848

Total Pages:200

Viewed:988

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Books Description:

Kyoto Animation, a studio with very humble beginnings, has gained recognition the world over as a uniquely inspired and inventive enterprise. This book examines Kyoto Animation’s philosophy and creative vision with close reference to its anime. It focuses on the studio’s choice of genres, themes and imagery while exploring its maintenance of high production values. The analysis highlights the studio’s commitment to the pursuit of both artistic excellence and technical experimentation—and its reliance on the imagination and expertise of in-house staff.

Race, Religion, and the Pulpit

Author:Julia Marie Robinson

Publisher:Wayne State University Press

ISBN:0814340377

Total Pages:216

Viewed:1421

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During the Great Migration of African Americans from the South to the cities of the Northeast, Midwest, and West, the local black church was essential in the making and reshaping of urban areas. In Detroit, there was one church and one minister in particular that demonstrated this power of the pulpit—Second Baptist Church of Detroit (“Second,” as many members called it) and its nineteenth pastor, the Reverend Robert L. Bradby. In Race, Religion, and the Pulpit: Rev. Robert L. Bradby and the Making of Urban Detroit, author Julia Marie Robinson explores how Bradby’s church became the catalyst for economic empowerment, community building, and the formation of an urban African American working class in Detroit. Robinson begins by examining Reverend Bradby’s formative years in Ontario, Canada; his rise to prominence as a pastor and community leader at Second Baptist in Detroit; and the sociohistorical context of his work in the early years of the Great Migration. She goes on to investigate the sometimes surprising nature of relationships between Second Baptist, its members, and prominent white elites in Detroit, including Bradby’s close relationship to Ford Motor Company and Henry Ford. Finally, Robinson details Bradby’s efforts as a “race leader” and activist, roles that were tied directly to his theology. She looks at the parts the minister played in such high-profile events as the organizing of Detroit’s NAACP chapter, the Ossian Sweet trial of the mid-1920s, the Scottsboro Boys trials in the 1930s, and the controversial rise of the United Auto Workers in Detroit in the 1940s. Race, Religion, and the Pulpit presents a full and nuanced picture of Bradby’s life that has so far been missing from the scholarly record. Readers interested in the intersections of race and religion in American history, as well as anyone with ties to Detroit’s Second Baptist Church, will appreciate this thorough volume.

A Companion to African American History

Author:Alton Hornsby, Jr.

Publisher:John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:1405137355

Total Pages:584

Viewed:821

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Books Description:

A Companion to African American History is a collection oforiginal and authoritative essays arranged thematically andtopically, covering a wide range of subjects from the seventeenthcentury to the present day. Analyzes the major sources and the most influential books andarticles in the field Includes discussions of globalization, region, migration,gender, class and social forces that make up the broad culturalfabric of African American history

The Black Shoals

Author:Tiffany Lethabo King

Publisher:Duke University Press

ISBN:1478005688

Total Pages:304

Viewed:1232

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In The Black Shoals Tiffany Lethabo King uses the shoal—an offshore geologic formation that is neither land nor sea—as metaphor, mode of critique, and methodology to theorize the encounter between Black studies and Native studies. King conceptualizes the shoal as a space where Black and Native literary traditions, politics, theory, critique, and art meet in productive, shifting, and contentious ways. These interactions, which often foreground Black and Native discourses of conquest and critiques of humanism, offer alternative insights into understanding how slavery, anti-Blackness, and Indigenous genocide structure white supremacy. Among texts and topics, King examines eighteenth-century British mappings of humanness, Nativeness, and Blackness; Black feminist depictions of Black and Native erotics; Black fungibility as a critique of discourses of labor exploitation; and Black art that rewrites conceptions of the human. In outlining the convergences and disjunctions between Black and Native thought and aesthetics, King identifies the potential to create new epistemologies, lines of critical inquiry, and creative practices.

The Saltwater Frontier

Author:Andrew Lipman

Publisher:Yale University Press

ISBN:0300216696

Total Pages:360

Viewed:1841

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Andrew Lipman’s eye-opening first book is the previously untold story of how the ocean became a “frontier” between colonists and Indians. When the English and Dutch empires both tried to claim the same patch of coast between the Hudson River and Cape Cod, the sea itself became the arena of contact and conflict. During the violent European invasions, the region’s Algonquian-speaking Natives were navigators, boatbuilders, fishermen, pirates, and merchants who became active players in the emergence of the Atlantic World. Drawing from a wide range of English, Dutch, and archeological sources, Lipman uncovers a new geography of Native America that incorporates seawater as well as soil. Looking past Europeans’ arbitrary land boundaries, he reveals unseen links between local episodes and global events on distant shores. Lipman’s book “successfully redirects the way we look at a familiar history” (Neal Salisbury, Smith College). Extensively researched and elegantly written, this latest addition to Yale’s seventeenth-century American history list brings the early years of New England and New York vividly to life.

Comparative Theology in the Millennial Classroom

Author:Mara Brecht,Reid B Locklin

Publisher:Routledge

ISBN:1317512502

Total Pages:242

Viewed:750

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This volume explores the twenty-first century classroom as a uniquely intergenerational space of religious disaffiliation, and questions about how our work in the classroom can be, and is being, re-imagined for the new generation. The culturally hybrid identity of Millennials shapes their engagement with religious "others" on campus and in the classroom, pushing educators of comparative theology to develop new pedagogical strategies that leverage ways of seeing and interacting with their teachers and classmates. Reflecting on religious traditions such as Islam, Judaism, African Traditional Religions, Hinduism, Christianity, and agnosticism/atheism, this volume theorizes the theological outcomes of current pedagogies and the shifting contours of comparative theological discourse.