The Crown of Thorns

Author:,

Publisher:Springer

ISBN:3319958976

Total Pages:209

Viewed:606

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Books Description:

This book examines how the Irish environmental movement, which began gaining momentum in the 1970s, has influenced and been addressed by contemporary Irish writers, artists, and musicians. It examines Irish environmental writing, music, and art within their cultural contexts, considers how postcolonial ecocriticism might usefully be applied to Ireland, and analyzes the rhetoric of Irish environmental protests. It places the Irish environmental movement within the broader contexts of Irish national and postcolonial discourses, focusing on the following protests: the M3 Motorway, the Burren campaign, the Carnsore Point anti-nuclear protest, Shell to Sea, the turf debate, and the animal rights movement.

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Contemporary Irish Poetry and the Pastoral Tradition

Author:Donna L. Potts

Publisher:University of Missouri Press

ISBN:082627269X

Total Pages:224

Viewed:1297

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In Contemporary Irish Poetry and the Pastoral Tradition, Donna L. Potts closely examines the pastoral genre in the work of six Irish poets writing today. Through the exploration of the poets and their works, she reveals the wide range of purposes that pastoral has served in both Northern Ireland and the Republic: a postcolonial critique of British imperialism; a response to modernity, industrialization, and globalization; a way of uncovering political and social repercussions of gendered representations of Ireland; and, more recently, a means for conveying environmentalism’s more complex understanding of the value of nature. Potts traces the pastoral back to its origins in the work of Theocritus of Syracuse in the third century and plots its evolution due to cultural changes. While all pastoral poems share certain generic traits, Potts makes clear that pastorals are shaped by social and historical contexts, and Irish pastorals in particular were influenced by Ireland’s unique relationship with the land, language, and industrialization due to England’s colonization. For her discussion, Potts has chosen six poets who have written significant collections of pastoral poetry and whose work is in dialogue with both the pastoral tradition and other contemporary pastoral poets. Three poets are men—John Montague, Seamus Heaney, Michael Longley—while three are women—Eavan Boland, Medbh McGuckian, Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill. Five are English-language authors, while the sixth—Ní Dhomhnaill—writes in Irish. Additionally, some of the poets hail from the Republic, while others originate from Northern Ireland. Potts contends that while both Irish Republic and Northern Irish poets respond to a shared history of British colonization in their pastorals, the 1921 partition of the country caused the pastoral tradition to evolve differently on either side of the border, primarily because of the North’s more rapid industrialization; its more heavily Protestant population, whose response to environmentalism was somewhat different than that of the Republic’s predominantly Catholic population; as well the greater impact of the world wars and the Irish Troubles. In an important distinction from other studies of Irish poetry, Potts moves beyond the influence of history and politics on contemporary Irish pastoral poetry to consider the relatively recent influence of ecology. Contemporary Irish poets often rely on the motif of the pastoral retreat to highlight various environmental threats to those retreats—whether they be high-rises, motorways, global warming, or acid rain. Potts concludes by speculating on the future of pastoral in contemporary Irish poetry through her examination of more recent poets—including Moya Cannon and Paula Meehan—as well as other genres such as film, drama, and fiction.

The Environmental Movement in Ireland

Author:Liam Leonard

Publisher:Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:9781402068126

Total Pages:234

Viewed:978

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Books Description:

This book examines key themes in Irish environmental politics, including the main components that have come to define such events, and incidents of environmental collective action in this country during forty years of growth and development. The author analyses the mobilization and framing processes undertaken in these disputes, locating them in the context of a wider rural identity that has shaped grassroots environmentalism in the Irish case.

Saltwater People

Author:Nonie Sharp

Publisher:Allen & Unwin

ISBN:1741150361

Total Pages:306

Viewed:833

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Books Description:

This book plunges the reader into the unique and vibrant sea worlds of the peoples of northern Australia. We come to learn how profoundly these saltwater people know their bountiful waters and shores, which to them are the sacred endowment of ancestor spirits to their clans - not only as a source of livelihood but of identity, cultural memory, community and spirituality. In contrast, in western tradition, the sea, unlike the land, cannot be owned - the notion of freedom of the seas has for centuries been a cornerstone of sea law. In Saltwater People, Nonie Sharp crosses between traditions to discover telling differences and surprising points of contact, illustrating how radically different attitudes maybe about the relationships of peoples to their 'territory'. Sharp's comparative approach touches on both historical and contemporary cases as far afield as Scandinavia, the US, Canada, New Zealand, offering fresh insight into issues of indigenous heritage; land and sea rights; public, private and common property; and environment. Her lively study compels non-indigenous readers to reflect on the origins of their own institutionalised rights to natural resources, and the wisdom each tradition may have for the other.